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Loading OpenStreetMap data in QGIS?


In QGIS 1.8 I used the openstreetmap plugin to request data from the server, or open a .osm XML file, which produced 3 layers (polygons, polylines and points) in QGIS.

This was great (give or take the 64bit bug which highly affects the freshly mapped area I work on), but how do I do that in QGIS 2.x?

I can't find any updated documentation about it.

In the vector menu, I've tried importing from osm servers, I get a .osm file, but then I'm stuck. There's a menu option for loading an XML file, but it produces a spatialite db, which apparently only has non-geometry tables when I try to add it as a spatialite layer. If I open the attribute table, I can see node ids, ways and so on, but I can't figure out how to actually make use of them.

I've also tried adding a vector layer from a .osm XML file. I get a gpsbabel window that shows nothing, then finally an invalid data source message in QGIS.


Update for QGIS 3.x: The old OSM importer from QGIS 2 was dropped in QGIS 3 due to lots of unresolved bugs. The QuickOSM plugin also enables to read osm raw files. You can use user Layer - Add Layer - Add Vector Layer instead. In that case, OSM data are opened with GDAL as documented by http://gdal.org/drv_osm.html


In QGIS 2.x, There are 3 steps involved

  1. Get an OSM File, you can get it using josm or overpass or any other source. It has to be a valid xml. You can also download it from qgis Vector > OpenStreetMap > Download OSM Data menu, but sometimes it does not give result. I would recommend using overpass turbo.
  2. Vector > OpenStreetMap > Import Topology from XML, this as you said will produce a spatialite database with non-geometry tables. This i think is the topology.
  3. Finally, you can get data by Vector > OpenStreetMap > Export Topology to Spatialite, here you need to give the db file made above and just like in qgis 1.8 you will have option to choose points, lines or polygons. Below that in exported tags section you can load all the tags contained in the file and select only those which you require. This is additional feature than in 1.8.

The layer gets added to map, if you want all nodes, ways you can repeat step 3 with other options.

http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/QGIS#QGIS2_OpenStreetMap_Vectors


I found downloading OSM data using the plugin and going through the import and export motions very tedious. That's why I wrote up a different solution: http://anitagraser.com/2014/05/31/a-guide-to-googlemaps-like-maps-with-osm-in-qgis/

Summary:

Raw OSM files can be quite huge. That's why it's definitely preferable to download the compressed binary .pbf format instead of the XML .osm format. As a download source, I'd recommend Geofabrik.

For the first preprocessing step: extracting the area of interest, we can use Osmosis:

C:Usersanita_000GeodataOSM_Noirmoutier>… inosmosis.bat --read-pbf pays-de-la-loire-latest.osm.pbf --bounding-box left=-2.59 bottom=46.58 right=-1.44 top=47.07 --write-xml noirmoutier.osm

While QGIS can also load .osm files, I found that performance and access to attributes is much improved if the .osm file is converted to spatialite.

C:Usersanita_000GeodataOSM_Noirmoutier>ogr2ogr -f "SQLite" -dsco SPATIALITE=YES noirmoutier.db noirmoutier.osm

In QGIS, we can load the points, lines, and multipolygons using Add SpatiaLite Layer. When we load the spatialite tables, there are some issues:

  • There is no land polygon. Instead, there are “coastline” line features.
  • Most river polygons are missing. Instead there are “riverbank” line features.

Creating the missing river polygons is not a big deal:

  1. select all the lines where waterway=riverbank.
  2. use the Polygonize tool from the processing toolbox to automatically create polygons from the areas enclosed by the selected riverbank lines. (Note that Processing by default operates only on the selected features but this setting can be changed in the Processing settings.)

Creating the land polygon (or sea polygon if you prefer that for some reason) is a little more involved since most of the time the coastline will not be closed for the simple reason that we are often cutting a piece of land out of the main continent. Therefore, before we can use the Polygonize tools, we have to close the area. To do that, I suggest to first select the coastline using "other_tags" LIKE '%"natural"=>"coastline"%' and create a new layer from this selection (save selection as… ) and edit it (don't forget to enable snapping!) to add lines to close the area. Then polygonize.


If you don't like the plugin, fetch the OSM data you need with Overpass API, and add the result to QGIS withAdd Vector Layer(enabelingAll filesfilter).

QGIS 2.0 uses GDAL 1.10's ogr2ogr OSM importer which does a good job.

Relation support seems to be better than the plugin does at the moment.

Just make sure you download ways and relations completely, that is all nodes of the ways, and all members of the relations, with all their nodes.


You know, you don't need to put the data into SpatialLite. You can just:

  1. Download the data (Vector > OpenStreetMap > Download Data, creates an .osm file)
  2. Load the data (.osm file) as a vector layer (Layer > Add Vector Layer). After you select the file, it'll ask you which layers you want to add (as GDAL makes separate files for each type: Point, Line, MultiLine, MultiPolygon, GeomCollection). Select what you want and load it up.

Go to Layer ‣ Add Raster Layer . Locate the downloaded BX24_GeoTifv1-02.tif and click Open .

This is a large raster file and you may notice that when you zoom or pan around the map, the map takes a little time to render the image. QGIS offers a simple solution to make rasters load much faster by using Image Pyramids. QGIS creates pre-rendered tiles at different resolutions and these are presented to you instead of the full raster. This makes map navigation snappy and responsive. Right-click the BX24_GeoTifv1-02 layer and choose Properties .

Choose the Pyramids tab. Hold the Ctrl key and select all the resolutions offered in the Resolutions panel. Leave other options to defaults and click Build pyramids . Once the process finishes, click OK .

Before we start, we need to set default Digitizing Options. Go to Settings ‣ Options. .

Select the Digitizing tab in the Options dialog. Set the Default snap mode to Vertex . This will allow you to snap to the nearest vertex. I also prefer to set the Default snapping tolerance and Search radius for vertex edits in pixels instead of map units. This will ensure that the snapping distance remains constant regardless of zoom level. Depending on your computer screen resolution, you may choose an appropriate value. Click OK .

Now we are ready to start digitizing. We will first create a roads layer and digitize the roads around the park area. Select New GeoPackage Layer. icon from Panels. A GeoPackage is an open, non-proprietary, platform-independent and, standards-based data format for geographic information system implemented as an SQLite database container. This makes it much easier to move it around instead of a bunch of shapefiles. In this tutorial, we are creating a couple of polygon layers and a line layer, so a GeoPackage will be better suited. You can always load a GeoPackage and export layers as a shapefile or any other format you want.

In the New GeoPackage Layer dialog, click the . button and save a new GeoPackage database named digitizing.gpkg . Choose the Table name as Roads and select Line as the Type . The base topographic map is in the EPSG:2193 - NZGD 2000 CRS.

When creating a GIS layer, you must decide on the attributes that each feature will have. Since this is a roads layer, we additionally will have 2 basic attributes - Name and Class. In New Field Enter Name of the type Text data , with 50 as Maximum length and click Add to attribute list. Now create a new attribute Class of the type Text data , with 50 as Maximum length . Click OK

Once the Roads layer is loaded, click the Toggle Editing button to put the layer in editing mode.

Click the Add Line Feature button. Click on the map canvas to add a new vertex. Add new vertices along with the road feature. Once you have digitized a road segment, right-click to end the feature.

You can use the scroll wheel of the mouse to zoom in or out while digitizing. You can also hold the scroll button and move the mouse to pan around.

After you right-click to end the feature, you will get a pop-up dialog called Road - Feature Attributes . Here you can enter attributes of the newly created feature. Since the fid is an Autogenerate field, you will not be able to enter a value manually. Leave it as such and enter the road name as it appears on the topo map. Optionally, assign a Road Class value as well. Click OK .

The default style of the new line layer is a thin line. Let's change it so we can better see the digitized features on the canvas. Right-click the Roads layer and select Properties .

Select the Symbology tab in the Layer Properties dialog. Choose a thicker line style such as topo road from the predefined styles. Click OK .

Now you will see the digitized road feature clearly. Click Save Layer Edits to commit the new feature to disk.

Before we digitize the remaining roads, it is important to update some other snap settings that are important to create an error free layer. Right-click on any empty space on the toolbar area and activate the Snapping toolbar

Now an Enable Snapping (Magnet Icon) will appear on the panel. Click on it to enable it and select All Layers and select Open Snapping Options.. .

In the Snapping options dialog, click the Snapping on intersection which allows you to snap on an intersection of a background layer.

Now you can click Add feature button and digitize other roads around the park. Make sure to click Save Edits after you add a new feature to save your work. A useful tool to help you with digitizing is the Vertex Tool. Click the Vertex Tool button and select Vertex Tool (Current Layer) .

Once the node tool is activated, click on any feature to show the vertices. Click on any vertex to select it. The vertex will change the color once it is selected. Now you can click and drag your mouse to move the vertex. This is useful when you want to make adjustments after the feature is created. You can also delete a selected vertex by clicking the Delete key. ( Option + Delete on a mac)

Once you have finished digitizing all the roads, click the Toggle Editing button. Click Save .

In the New GeoPackage Layer dialog, click the . button and select GeoPackage database named digitizing.gpkg . Name the new layer as an attribute called Parks . and select MultiPolygon as the Type . The base topographic map is in the EPSG:2193 - NZGD 2000 CRS. Click OK . In New Field Enter Name of the type Text data , with 50 as Maximum length and click :guilabel:` Add to attribute list.`

Polygon - Planar Surface defined by 1 exterior boundary and 0 or more interior boundaries. Each interior boundary defines a hole in the Polygon. Multi-Polygon - It is used to represent areas with holes inside or consisting of multiple disjoint areas. For eg, 3 discontinuous polygons can be drawn and grouped as a single feature.

Now select layer Parks then Toggle Editing and click the Add feature button and click on the map canvas to add a polygon vertex. Digitize the polygon representing the park. Make sure you snap to the road's vertices so there are no gaps between the park polygons and road lines. Right-click to finish the polygon.

Enter the park name in the Parks - Feature Attributes pop-up.

Multi-Polygon layers offer another very useful setting called Avoid intersections of new polygons. Select Enable Snapping (Magnet Icon), click on it to enable it and click :guilabel:` All Layers` and select Advanced Configuration . Choose Avoid Overlap on Active layers from the forth button in Enable snapping toolbar. Now in Edit Advanced Configuration Check the box in the Avoid Overlap column in the row for the Parks layer.

Click on Add feature to add a polygon. With the Avoid Overlap, you will be able to quickly digitize a new polygon without worrying about snapping exactly to the neighboring polygons.

Right-click to finish the polygon and enter the attributes. Magically the new polygon is shrunk and snapped exactly to the boundary of the neighboring polygons! This is very useful when digitizing complex boundaries where you need not be very precise and still have topologically correct polygon. Click Toggle Editing to finish editing the Parks layer.

Now it is time to digitize a building's layer. Create a new polygon layer named Buildings by clicking on New GeoPackage Layer. icon from Panels.

Once the Buildings layer is added, turn off the Parks and Roads layer so the base topo map is visible. Select the Buildings layer and click Toggle Editing .

Digitizing buildings can be a cumbersome task. Also, it is difficult to add vertices manually so that the edges are perpendicular and form a rectangle. We will use a QGIS toolbar called Shapes Digitizing to help with this task. Right-click on any empty space on the toolbar area and activate

the Shapes Digitizing Toolbar .

Zoom to an area with the buildings and click Rectangle by Extent button. Click and drag the mouse to draw a perfect rectangle. Similarly, add remaining buildings.

You will notice that some buildings are not vertical. We will need to draw a rectangle at an angle to match the building footprint. Click the Rectangle from center .

Click at the center of the building and drag the mouse to draw a vertical rectangle.

We need to rotate this rectangle to match the image on the topo map. The rotate tool is available in the Advanced Digitizing toolbar. Right-click on an empty area on the toolbar section and enable the Advanced Digitizing toolbar.

Click the Rotate Feature(s) button.

Use the Select Single feature tool to select the polygon that you want to rotate. Once the Rotate Feature(s) tool is activated, you will see crosshairs at the center of the polygon. Click exactly on that crosshairs and drag the mouse while holding the left-click button. A preview of the rotated feature will appear. Let go of the mouse button when the polygon aligns with the building footprint.

Save the layer edits and click Toggle Editing once you finish digitizing all buildings. You can drag the layers to change their order of appearance.

The digitizing task is now complete. You can play with the styling and labeling options in layer properties to create a nice looking map from the data you created.

© Copyright 2019, Ujaval Gandhi.
Cập nhật mới nhất vào thg 6 30, 2021.
Created using Sphinx 4.0.1.


Where can I download more data sources for qgis?

I have the natural earth kit, tho I want to expand on it further. Do you guys know about/have links to other sources?

Also, do I need to download the openstreetmap data or is it already included in qgis? Is google earth data available for qgis?

Thanks a lot to everyone who reply!

Hey sorry for the delay, so this data is mostly for us or worldwide data?

There's tons of sources. Give us more specifics - what's your area of interest?

Ok, There's one I remember. A. K. Lobeck made many maps that were physiographic diagrams of the continents. Can we make maps like that?

P.s. Do we have data about the geological age of land and sea regions like this area formed in archaen eon, this in the caenozoic era, etc?

OSM data is not included in Qgis nativliy but the plugin QuickOSM let's you download features inside a set area. Or you could download the data via geofabrik. With the plugin QuickMapServices you can load several raster layers into your project (including google satillite and other satillite imagery).


Loading OpenStreetMap data in QGIS? - Geographic Information Systems

Introduction

This training introduces students to both the social and technical aspects of digital mapping. Students will learn fundamental concepts and techniques in cartography and GIS, including file types, data classification, projections and coordinate systems and elementary analytical techniques in a range of desktop and web-based mapping platforms. In addition to providing the fundamental technical competencies necessary to create maps, students will develop the critical awareness required to effectively communicate complex social processes through maps.

Who should apply?

Government, Environment, Data analysis, Retailing, Fleet management, Marketing, Property development, Emergency response, Transport, Military defense, Healthcare, Oil and gas, Agriculture, mining, disaster risk management Forestry, M&E, WASH, Engineers, Telecommunications Utilities, geographers, teachers, journalists, students etc.

Learning Objectives

Upon course completion, participants should be able to:

i. Define and differentiate between variety of spatial data models and formats

ii. Explain and apply the basics of representation in GIS, including using vector and raster data formats, determining appropriate geographic coordinate system for a given spatial data file and applying the appropriate geographic projection to a map type and spatial scale

iii. Manipulate geospatial datasets (e.g. cleaning, joining, querying, extracting) .

iv. Apply appropriate thematic map symbology to represent geographic phenomena

v. Produce static map products that integrate multiple data types and analytical methods

vi. Obtain geospatial data from a variety of online sources and integrate into mapping processes

vii. Integrate desktop GIS procedures with web-based mapping platforms

Course Content

Module 1: Introduction, cartography and GIS, and creating maps in QGIS

a. Gain a basic conceptual understanding of cartography, GIS, and mapping

b. Gain familiarity with geographic data and information, and how it's encoded within computer files

c. Gain a basic familiarity with the QGIS interface

d. Gain awareness of spatial reference and projection issues

e. Practice opening a variety of geographic data with QGIS and viewing their attributes within QGIS

f. Perform basic map styling

g. Create and export a basic map as a static image file

Module 2: Thematic data mapping, Geocoding and point in polygon analysis

a. Load shape files and CSV data into QGIS

c. Create classed choropleth map d.

d. Adjust the legend to help the map tell a clearer story

e. Load tabular CSV data into QGIS and performing a tabular join

f. Obtaining and working with US Census data

g. Understand and perform geocoding of tabular data

h. Learn about some of the geocoding tools available online

i. Understand and perform a point in polygon analysis

Module 3: Heat maps, creating and editing vector Geometries

b. Create a 'heat map' representation of the data

e. Digitizing data with Open Street Map in QGIS

f. Introduction to Open Street Map

g. Importing OpenStreetMap data

h. Importing OpenStreetMap data: SpatialLite Database

i. Data filtering and extraction

j. Exporting layers to a local CRS

k. Introduction to Geoprocessing

l. Geoprocessing with a buffer analysis

m. Extracting and preparing thematic OSM data

n. Filtering OSM data to create desired features

o. Managing CRSs in a Geoprocessing Workflow

p. Extracting attribute types of interest

q. Creating a buffer around a Polyline feature

r. Clipping features within a buffer

s. Geoprocessing functions

t. Using the Graphical Processing Modeler to automate workflows

Module 4: Intergrating QGIS with CartoDB, advanced mapping techniques with QGIS and CartoDB

a. Creating a CartoDB account and exploring the documentation and interface

b. Loading data into CartoDB

c. Using the QGIS CartoDB plugin

d. Pulling data down into QGIS for processing

e. Pushing data backup to CartoDB

f. Making a thematic map in CartoDB

h. Data symbolization and analysis in CartoDB

i. Creating an unclassed proportional symbol map in CartoDB

j. Creating shareable and interactive web maps with QGIS

Methodology

The instructor led trainings are delivered using a blended learning approach and comprises of presentations, guided sessions of practical exercise, web-based tutorials and group work. Our facilitators are seasoned industry experts with years of experience, working as professional and trainers in these fields.

i. The participant must be conversant with English.

ii. Upon completion of training the participant will be issued with an Authorized Training Certificate

iii. Course duration is flexible and the contents can be modified to fit any number of days.

iv. The course fee includes facilitation training materials, 2 coffee breaks, buffet lunch and a Certificate upon successful completion of Training.

v. One-year post-training support Consultation and Coaching provided after the course.

vi. Payment should be done at least a week before commence of the training, to DATASTAT CONSULTANCY LTD account, as indicated in the invoice so as to enable us prepare better for you .

Course Fee: Ksh 80,000, USD 900

Course Schedule


GIS Data Collection, Analysis, Visualization and Mapping Course

This course comprises 10 modules, each with their own learning objectives and target deliverable. This training introduces students to both the social and technical aspects of digital mapping. Students will learn fundamental concepts and techniques in cartography and GIS, including file types, data classification, projections and coordinate systems and elementary analytical techniques in a range of desktop and web-based mapping platforms.

In addition to providing the fundamental technical competencies necessary to create maps, students will develop the critical awareness required to effectively communicate complex social processes through maps. Modules consist of an applied “hands-on” lesson.

Course Objectives

  • Integrate desktop GIS procedures with web-based mapping platforms
  • Define and differentiate between variety of spatial data models and formats
  • Manipulate geospatial datasets (e.g. cleaning, joining, querying, extracting)
  • Apply appropriate thematic map symbology to represent geographic phenomena
  • Explain and apply the basics of representation in GIS, including using vector and raster data formats, determining appropriate geographic coordinate system for a given spatial data file and applying the appropriate geographic projection to a map type and spatial scale
  • Produce static map products that integrate multiple data types and analytical methods
  • Obtain geospatial data from a variety of online sources and integrate into mapping processes

Course Outline

Module 1: Introduction to new maps plus, cartography and GIS, and creating maps in QGIS

  • Gain a basic conceptual understanding of cartography, GIS, and mapping
  • Gain familiarity with geographic data and information, and how it’s encoded within computer files
  • Download and install a free and open-source GIS application (QGIS)
  • Gain a basic familiarity with the QGIS interface
  • Gain awareness of spatial reference and projection issues
  • Practice opening a variety of geographic data with QGIS and viewing their attributes within QGIS
  • Perform basic map styling
  • Create and export a basic map as a static image file

Module 2: Thematic data mapping with table joins

  • Load shape files and CSV data into QGIS
  • Reproject the map into an equal-area projection
  • Create classed choropleth map
  • Adjust the legend to help the map tell a more clear story
  • Load tabular CSV data into QGIS and performing a tabular join

Module 03: Geocoding and point in polygon analysis

  • Obtaining and working with US Census data
  • Understand and perform geocoding of tabular data
  • Learn about some of the geocoding tools available online
  • Understand and perform a point in polygon analysis

Module 04: Hexbin and heat mapping

  • Map point data
  • Create new polygon shapefiles of hexagon shapes and raster heatmaps
  • Determine the number of different good types within each polygon
  • Play with various classification schemes for representing the data
  • Create a ‘heat map’ representation of the data

Module 05: Creating and editing vector Geometries

  • Georeferencing
  • Using the GDAL Georeferencer
  • Digitizing data
  • Digitizing data with Open Street Map in QGIS

Module 06: Openstreetmap data and Introduction to Geoprocessing tools

  • A deeper look at Open Street Map
  • Importing OpenStreetMap data: QuickOSM
  • Importing OpenStreetMap data: SpatialLite Database
  • Data filtering and extraction
  • Exporting layers to a local CRS
  • Introduction to Geoprocessing
  • Geoprocessing with a buffer analysis

Module 07: Geoprocessing in QGIS and automating workflows

  • Extracting and preparing thematic OSM data
  • Filtering OSM data to create desired features
  • Managing CRSs in a Geoprocessing Workflow
  • Extracting attribute types of interest
  • Creating a buffer around a Polyline feature
  • Clipping features within a buffer
  • Geoprocessing functions
  • Using the Graphical Processing Modeler to automate workflows

Module 08: Integrating QGIS with cartodb

  • Creating a CartoDB account and exploring the documentation and interface
  • Loading data into CartoDB
  • Using the QGIS CartoDB plugin
  • Pulling data down into QGIS for processing
  • Pushing data backup to CartoDB
  • Making a thematic map in CartoDB

Module 09: Advanced mapping techniques with QGIS and cartodb


How to assign contour data (z values) from a shapefile onto point data in another layer in QGIS

I have a point layer containing sites, and I have another vector layer that contains contours with z values (not topography related). I would like to assign the z values of the contours to each of the points. How would I go about doing that? Any help is greatly appreciated, I've tried everthing!

Convert the contours to a surface (raster), overlay the points, then extract the values

Standard way would be to make a raster surface from the contours by interpolation (I like triangulation then overlay the points. The contours were almost certainly generated from a continuous dataset like a raster in the first place, so if you can track that down instead and use it you'll get better accuracy.

If you just want the value of the nearest contour, the processing toolbox "Join attributes by nearest" should do it. There is quite detailed help text in the tool itself when you open it.


Acquire shape file

Remember, our goal here is to identify which houses are along the water. We’ve got our houses plotted on our nice map, but now how are we supposed to find the ones that are on the waterfront? Well, I had a bunch of terrible ideas but finally decided that if I know where the water is, I can find out which houses are close to it.

I know that sounds too obvious to be of any worth, and honestly, I felt silly just typing it out and saying it in my head. It makes perfect sense though, in order to get information on how one thing relates to another thing, you need to know information about both things right? So here’s where we find water!

The shapefile I used was downloaded open-source from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and is my first stop when searching for any GIS related datasets.

Once you find the shape file that works for your data. You can simply drag the file from your folder onto the map and it will establish itself as a layer!


Manually building a tile server (13.04) This page describes how to install, setup and configure all the necessary software to operate your own tile server. The step-by-step instructions are written for Ubuntu Linux 13.04 Software installation The OSM tile server stack is a collection of programs and libraries that work together to create a tile…

Reference Wikipedia Link osmDB.pm is a module (in extension to osm.pm) to transfer data extracted from an osm file into a mysql database. Motivation With the growing size of germany.osm (or osm in general) it is becoming harder by the day to handle all this data. Especially if not enough RAM is present. So I…


GIS DATA COLLECTION, MANAGEMENT, ANALYSIS, VISUALIZATION AND MAPPING TRAINING

This training introduces students to both the social and technical aspects of digital mapping. Students will learn fundamental concepts and techniques in cartography and GIS, including file types, data classification, projections and coordinate systems and elementary analytical techniques in a range of desktop and web-based mapping platforms. In addition to providing the fundamental technical competencies necessary to create maps, students will develop the critical awareness required to effectively communicate complex social processes through maps. This course comprises 10 modules, each with their own learning objectives and target deliverable. Modules consist of an applied "hands-on" lesson.

By the end of this course the participants will be able to:

&bull Define and differentiate between variety of spatial data models and formats

&bull Explain and apply the basics of representation in GIS, (including using vector and raster data formats, determining appropriate geographic coordinate system for a given spatial data file and applying the appropriate geographic projection to a map type and spatial scale)

&bull Manipulate geospatial datasets (e.g. cleaning, joining, querying, extracting)

&bull Apply appropriate thematic map symbology to represent geographic phenomena

&bull Produce static map products that integrate multiple data types and analytical methods

&bull Obtain geospatial data from a variety of online sources and integrate into mapping processes

&bull Integrate desktop GIS procedures with web-based mapping platforms

The course targets government representatives, project teams, NGOs, multi and bilateral development organizations, consultancies, etc, who work as M&E specialists, project managers, researchers and technical specialists.

Module 1: Introduction to new maps plus, cartography and GIS, and creating maps in QGIS

&bull Basics of cartography, GIS, and mapping

&bull Introduction of geographic data and information and its coding

&bull Downloading and Installing a free and open-source GIS application (QGIS)

&bull Spatial reference and projection issues

&bull Working with geographic data with QGIS and viewing their attributes within QGIS

&bull Creating and exporting a basic map as a static image file

Module 2: Thematic data mapping with table joins

&bull Load shape files and CSV data into QGIS

&bull Reproject the map into an equal-area projection

&bull Create classed choropleth map

&bull Load tabular CSV data into QGIS and performing a tabular join

Module 03: Geocoding and point in polygon analysis

&bull Obtain and work with US Census data

&bull Geocoding of tabular data

Module 04: Hexbin and heat mapping

&bull Create new polygon shape files of hexagon shapes and raster heat maps

&bull Determine the number of different good types within each polygon

&bull Play with various classification schemes for representing the data

&bull Create a 'heat map' representation of the data

Module 05: Creating and editing vector Geometries

&bull Using the GDAL Georeferencer

&bull Data digitization with Open Street Map in QGIS

Module 06: Openstreetmap data and Introduction to Geoprocessing tools

&bull Introduction to Open Street Map

&bull Importing OpenStreetMap data: QuickOSM

&bull Importing OpenStreetMap data: SpatialLite Database

&bull Filtering and extraction od data

&bull Exporting layers to a local CRS

&bull Geoprocessing with a buffer analysis

Module 07: Geoprocessing in QGIS and automating workflows

&bull Extracting and preparing thematic OSM data

&bull Filtering OSM data to create desired features

&bull Managing CRSs in a Geoprocessing Workflow

&bull Extracting attribute types of interest

&bull Creating a buffer around a Polyline feature

&bull Clipping features within a buffer

&bull Using the Graphical Processing Modeler to automate workflows

Module 08: Integrating QGIS with cartodb

&bull Creating a CartoDB account and exploring the documentation and interface

&bull Loading data into CartoDB

&bull Using the QGIS CartoDB plugin

&bull Pulling data down into QGIS for processing

&bull Pushing data backup to CartoDB

&bull Making a thematic map in CartoDB

Module 09: Advanced mapping techniques with QGIS and cartodb

&bull Symbolizing point data and "Bubble Maps" in CartoDB

&bull Creating an unclassed proportional symbol map in CartoDB

&bull Using SQL and PostGIS to perform Geoprocessing tasks in the browser

Module 10: Bringing it all together (course project)

&bull Each student will select from suggested datasets to create a final course project

&bull Students can use CartoDB or Mapbox Studio

&bull This course is delivered by our seasoned trainers who have vast experience as expert professionals in the respective fields of practice. The course is taught through a mix of practical activities, theory, group works and case studies.

&bull Training manuals and additional reference materials are provided to the participants.

&bull Upon successful completion of this course, participants will be issued with a certificate.

&bull We can also do this as tailor-made course to meet organization-wide needs. Contact us to find out more: [email protected]

&bull The training will be conducted at DATA-AFRIQUE TRAINING CENTRE, NAIROBI KENYA.

&bull The training fee covers tuition fees, training materials, lunch and training venue. Accommodation and airport transfer are arranged for our participants upon request.


Loading OpenStreetMap data in QGIS? - Geographic Information Systems

This repository hosts the code underlying Geocomputation with R, a book by Robin Lovelace, Jakub Nowosad, and Jannes Muenchow.

The online version of the book is developed at https://geocompr.robinlovelace.net/. We plan to publish the hard copy of the book with CRC Press in 2018.

We encourage contributions on any part of the book, including:

  • Improvements to the text, e.g. clarifying unclear sentences, fixing typos (see guidance from Yihui Xie).
  • Changes to the code, e.g. to do things in a more efficient way.
  • Suggestions on content (see the project's issue tracker and the work-in-progress folder for chapters in the pipeline).

Please see our_style.md for the book's style.

To ease reproducibility, this book is also a package. Installing it from GitHub will ensure all dependencies to build the book are available on your computer (you need devtools):

You need a recent version of the GDAL, GEOS, Proj.4 and UDUNITS libraries installed for this to work on Mac and Linux. See the sf package's README for information on that.

Once the dependencies have been installed you should be able to build and view a local version the book with:

To reduce the book's dependencies, scripts to be run infrequently to generate input for the book are run on creation of this README.

The additional packages required for this can be installed as follows:

With these additional dependencies installed, you should be able to run the following scripts, which create input figures for the book:

Note: the .Rproj file is configured to build a website not a single page. To reproduce this README use the following command:

An indication of the book's progress over time is illustrated below (to be updated roughly every week as the book progresses).

Book statistics: estimated number of pages per chapter over time.

To cite packages used in this book we use code from Efficient R Programming:

This generates .bib and .csv files containing the packages. The current of packages used can be read-in as follows:

Other citations are stored online using Zotero and downloaded with:

If you would like to add to the references, please use Zotero, join the open group add your citation to the open geocompr library.


Watch the video: Extracting Data from OpenStreetMap using QGIS u0026 QuickOSM (October 2021).